Ford Granada MK2 (1977–1985)

The square and straight-lined ’78 appeared in August and was produced until April 1985 following a mild facelift and attention to drivetrain NVH in . It was a development of the previous car, the main differences being the “” V6 engine in 2.0 L, 2.3 L and 2.8 L forms replacing the older “Essex” unit (which had never been offered in the built Granadas), and the introduction of features such as air conditioning and, for the top-price 2.8-litre versions, fuel-injection. In mainland Europe, a 1.7 L V4 was originally available. By the time of its introduction, UK Granada production had been quietly abandoned “for some time”: UK market Granada IIs were imported from Germany. Internally within Ford, the “” 1.7, 2.0, 2.3 and 2.8 units were the last derivatives of the ‘V-’ range of engines.

The coupé was discontinued when the new model began production, although there was a two-door saloon version in certain European markets. A relatively low number of vehicles were also produced with the Peugeot 504 / 505 four-cylinder diesel engine in 1.9-, 2.1- and 2.5-litre capacities. Originally only available as four-door sedans (the later 2.5 also as an estate), most of these went to taxi operators, and few survive. The smallest 1.9 was quite underpowered and was soon replaced by the somewhat more powerful 2.1, which was presented as the “Granada GLD” in March 1979 at Geneva. By 1982, this was replaced by the more capable 2.5.

As the range matured another two models were introduced. A sports based Granada was introduced as the Granada 2.8 Injection which had white alloy wheels and a black bootlid spoiler. This model borrowed the 2.8i “injected” engine from the Ghia model range. Towards the end of its production run, the introduction of the 2.0 and 2.3 LX saloon and estate UK marketing packs provided versions with a slightly higher specification than the “base” L models.
A special Ford of Britain only marketing pack edition of the Ghia X model was later introduced as the “ Ghia X Executive” which standardised luxury appointments such as the high grade Connolly Leather interior that had previously been an optional fitment. Further refinements such an electric sunroof, electric opening boot on saloons, electric seat adjustment, heated seats, trip computer and air conditioning set the Granada Ghia X above most other cost comparable executive cars available in the UK in the early eighties. There was also a special “Taxi” edition, available only in black, which included a foot-operated “panic button” in the drivers’ footwell which would operate the alarm system. In addition to these two models the range was complemented by estate models which reflected the same appointment levels as the entire saloon range including the Ghia X, but not the Ghia X Executive model.

Special models
Ford subcontracted assembly to Hyundai Motor Company in South Korea for sales in that market, where it continued to be sold from October to 1986 when it gave way to the Hyundai Grandeur instead of smaller European Fords like the and Escort. Production ended in December 1985, after 4,743 had been built. The car originally received a 2.0-liter V6 engine with a 2-barrel Solex carburetor, but after 1980 the more economical 2-litre four-cylinder was also available. The Granada competed with the Saehan Rekord as well as the Peugeot 604, imported by Kia Motors. Chung Mong-pil, the eldest son of Hyundai’s founder Chung Ju-yung, died in a car accident in a Granada.
Additionally, hearses were offered by outside conversion companies, as well as a series of four-door limousines built by . These included the slightly stretched “Minster” 15 cm, and the 68 cm longer “Dorchester” and better equipped “Grosvenor”. As of autumn 1982 the Dorchester was also available in an estate version with elongated rear doors, called the “Windsor”.

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