Ford F-Series (1948-1952) first generation

The is a series of full-size pickup trucks from Ford Motor Company which has been sold continuously for over six decades. The most popular variant of the is the F-150. It was the best-selling vehicle in the United States for 24 years, currently (2007) the best-selling truck for 34 years, and the best selling vehicle in Canada, though this does not include combined sales of GM pickup trucks. In the tenth generation of the , the F-250 and F-350 changed body style in 1998 and joined the Super Duty series.

During the post-World War II era, smaller Canadian rural communities had access to either a Ford dealer or a Lincoln-Mercury-Meteor dealer, but not both; a Mercury-badged version was sold at Lincoln-Mercury-Meteor dealers there from 1946-. Other than the grilles, trim, and badging, these trucks were identical to their Ford counterparts.


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https://youtube.com/watch?v=_UTXF-RetS8

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The first F-Series truck (known as the Ford Bonus-Built) was introduced in 1948 as a replacement for the previous car-based pickup line introduced in 1941. The F-Series was sold in eight different weight ratings, with pickup, panel truck, cab-over engine (COE), conventional truck, and school bus chassis body styles.

The first-generation Ford F-Series is a series of pickup trucks and commercial vehicles produced by Ford Motor Company. Introduced in 1948, the F-Series was the first post-war truck design from Ford. In a break from previous Ford trucks, the F-Series was no longer based upon its car chassis, but on a dedicated truck platform. This generation of the F-Series would remain in production until 1952. F-Series trucks were assembled at sixteen different Ford factories. Serial numbers indicate the truck model, engine, year, assembly plant, and unit number. The most common model was the F-1 with a 6 ½-foot bed followed by the F-2 and F-3 Express models with an 8-foot (2.4 m) bed.

The first F-Series truck (known as the Ford Bonus-Built) was introduced in 1948 as a replacement for the previous car-based pickup line introduced in 1941. It had a flat, one-piece windshield and integrated headlamps.[1] It had a wider cab. Options included the “See-Clear” windshield washer (operated by foot plunger), passenger-side windshield wiper & sun visor, and passenger-side taillight. The F-1 truck was also available with additional chrome trim and two horns as an option. All F-series were available with optional “Marmon-Herrington All Wheel Drive” until .
Design of the F-Series truck changed tremendously from 1950 to 1954. From 1948 to 1950, the grill was a series of horizontal bars and the headlights were set into the fenders. For 1951 and 1952, the headlights were connected by a wide aerodynamic cross piece with three similarly aerodynamic supports. The rear window was wider in the later trucks and the dashboard was redesigned.

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The F-Series was sold in four basic models. Along with the pickup truck (F-1 through F3), the F-Series was sold as a panel truck (based on the pickup), COE/cab-over engine chassis (F-5 and F-6, branded C-Series) and school bus chassis (F-5 and F-6, branded B-Series). Above the F-5, the F-Series was a medium-duty and heavy-duty conventional truck sharing the bodywork of the smaller F-Series.

The models are:
F-1: 1/2 ton (4,700 GVWR max.)
F-2: 3/4 ton (5,700 GVWR max.)
F-3: Heavy Duty 3/4 ton (6,800 GVWR max.)
F-3: Parcel Delivery (7,000 GVWR max) & optional rear spring pkg (7,800 GVWR max.)
F-4: 1 ton (7,500 GVWR max) & optional 1¼ ton pkg (10,000 GVWR max.)
F-5: 1½ ton: Conventional, school bus, and cab over engine (C.O.E.) (10,000–14,500 GVWR)
F-6: 2 ton: Conventional, school bus, and C.O.E. (14,000–16,000 GVWR)
F-7: Conventional (17,000–19,000 GVWR)
F-8: Conventional (20,000–22,000 GVWR)


source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ford_F-Series and http://www.youtube.com

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